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Speed limitation at peak hours

Published on 05/06/2019

News

On the A6 and A1 during morning rush hours from the Belgian border to Kirchberg (03.06-12.07.2019)


How do traffic jams form on the roads?
 On Monday, June 3, a speed regulation test phase during peak hours was implemented on the A6 and A1. From the Belgian border to Kirchberg, the maximum authorised speed is limited to 90km/h between 6h15 and 9h15. This measure is intended to make traffic more fluid.
 
Indeed, this reduction in speed reduces the risk of sudden braking at highway access points, because cars getting on the highway have a speed closer to that of vehicles already on the highway. While respecting speed limits and safety distances, they must neither brake nor change lanes to make room.
 
Traffic jams are formed, among other things, due to sudden manoeuvres: accelerations, braking, lane changes... So for traffic to remain fluid, it is important to always be attentive to other cars to react in time while avoiding sudden manoeuvres.
The video below explains in pictures the main origins of the corks.


 


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